Shreya Sundar Iyer: Meet TVS Racing's first Indian woman rider

TVS Racing on 26 April signed their first woman rider, Shreya Sundar Iyer, for the Indian National Rally championship.

Speaking to reporters, Shreya said it is not true that motorsport is only for men because there are many women motorists, who have achieved big feats in the sport world over.

"Motorsport has always been considered a male-dominated sport, which actually is not true. There are so many women out there riding and driving," she said.



Shreya said there is a need for more women riders, and is glad that TVS Racing is encouraging women to take this sport up as a career.

Shreya (24) began riding at the age of 17 and rode extensively across India including the isolated Suru valley in the Himalayas and also completed a rigorous Southern India biking expedition of 2,000 kilometers in just 6 days.

Shreya further said she has been training hard for the national rally championship for the last two weeks and it is a challenge for her to get into the groove ahead of the competition.

Asked about her role model, Shreya said it is not necessary for any big names to be around, but inspiration could be drawn from everywhere. "I don't think you need big names, but if you look around you, you can draw inspiration from everywhere," she said.

TVS Racing Team Head Arvind Pangaonkar said the association with Shreya will encourage women to consider racing as a career.

"We make continuous efforts to take the sport to as many section of the society as possible and create the ultimate machine and promote the riders," he said.

Motorcycle Makers Are Targeting Women Riders In India




The world's motorcycle manufacturers have enjoyed good sales in India for years, but a new market is emerging as more women take to riding the roads on two wheels.

In a developing country, where not everyone can afford a car, motorbikes are a popular and economical way of getting around, but most riders are men.



Now, an increasing number of women are riding big motorcycles and as the BBC's Rajini Vaidyanathan reports they are forming their own clubs.

A Journey With A Woman Taxi Driver in Rural Pune




If you find yourself looking to hail a taxi in the quaint temple town of Jejuri in Pune District, ask for Ranjana Chawan. She is in her early 30s, a proud mother of two who got married off early as is custom in her region and her biggest regret about it remains that it severely cut short her education. Then, she says, fate and circumstances brought her to a crossroad where she made the choice of taking up an unlikely profession. She became a rare woman in the male-dominated domain of public transport in rural India.

The taxi belongs to her husband but as he kept spiralling down the rabbit hole of alcohol addiction, Ranjana took over the driver's seat. She plies her four-wheeler down the potholed winding roads around Jejuri ferrying her passengers to their destinations and back. It's a hard days living but she's happy with what it gets her. It keeps the stoves burning, her children go to school and the household is running efficiently.

She is proud and content and wishes for just two things - that the traffic department forego her lack of education and finally recognize her right to drive and earn a livelihood. And grant her the licence that she has been trying for. And that her husband would quit his addiction.

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